Getting Crafty with Burlap + 5 Burlap Craft Projects

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This is a sponsored post from BurlapFabric.com. All opinions are 100% mine.

burlap chevrons

Have you ever crafted with burlap? As sustainable fabrics go, burlap is among the most cost-effective, and once you get used to working with it, it’s a lot of fun!

Burlap is made from jute, which actually has quite a bit in common with hemp. Like hemp, it grows fast, requires few to no pesticides, and doesn’t need a lot of water to grow. Also like hemp, it also improves the soil where you plant it, rather than depleting the nutrients. Unlike cotton, you don’t have to worry as much about whether your burlap is organic, because as far as I know there is no genetically modified jute out there.

Where to Find Burlap

I haven’t been able to find burlap at the fabric store, but there are a couple of easy ways to get your hands on some.

  • The coffee shop. If you’re in good with a local coffee shop that roasts its own beans, try asking them if they have any leftover bags you can take off their hands. “Green” (unroasted) coffee beans often come in big burlap sacks.
  • Online. BurlapFabric.com, the sponsor of this post, is a great online resource for burlap fabric and even some burlap sewing notions. I am itching to get my hands on their jute webbing for my next tote project, and I love that they also offer reclaimed burlap coffee sacks for sale for those of us too shy to hit up shops ourselves. You can find their fabrics in their shop and keep up with them on their Facebook and Pinterest pages.

How to Sew with Burlap

There are a couple of things to keep in mind when you’re sewing with burlap:

  • It is messy. Cut burlap loves to shed, so be prepared to wipe down your sewing table after you’ve been working with burlap. It’s also a good idea to clean your machine a little more often if you’re using a lot of burlap. Nothing serious, but use that brush to clean out the area around the bobbin case, since all of those tiny fibers will get into your machine.
  • Burlap is a loose weave. You can use a straight stitch with burlap, but for finishing I have found a zig zag or other embroidery stitch to work better. Because it’s a loose weave, the extra stitches help catch all of the fibers to create a better finished edge. Your finished project will be stronger this way.

Other than that, you can really treat burlap like any other medium to heavy weight fabric.

5 Burlap Craft Projects

how to make fabric flowersRight, so you have your burlap, you know how to use it….what now? Here are some burlap craft projects to get you going!

  1. Make a burlap fabric box.
  2. Whip up some burlap sunflowers.
  3. Burlap sunglasses case
  4. Create a burlap bird ornament.
  5. Dress up an old lampshade with burlap ruffles.

Have you done any fun burlap crafts lately? Share your ideas in the comments!

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